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társalKodÓ c1 date:



KJF Language Examination Centre

C1

Monolingual Exam


English



Exam papers

Maximum score

Required Minimum

Time allowed

Dictionary

1. Use of English

12

none







2. Reading 1

16

12 points

75 minutes

not allowed

3. Reading 2

12







4. Writing

40

16 points

90 minutes

allowed

Total score

80 points




165 minutes




Kodolányi János Főiskola

Székesfehérvár

1. Use of English

Read the text below. Some words are missing from the text. Choose the correct answer from the options (A, B, C or D) for each gap (1-15) in the text. Mark your answers with an X in the table on Answer Sheet 1. An example (0) has been given for you.


The Education of an American Tourist
The shiny consumerism of Dubai is more unsettling1 than the sight of burqas2 and mosques.
Where are the camels? What time is the belly-dancing show? I’d like to think that questions like these didn’t (0)___B____ to me on my first visit to the Middle East, that I was somehow more (1)________ than the typical narrow-minded American tourist, but unfortunately that wasn’t the case. When I first visited the region it was all very odd - I felt (2)________, but not for the reasons you might expect. It wasn’t because of the lack of camels or belly dancers, or because of seeing women in burqas and wearing Chanel sunglasses. I was a little bit (3)________ by the Middle East as it was all so shiny and new, no traces of history to be seen anywhere.
After that first trip I returned to the Middle East many times. When I was (4)________ a Middle Eastern fashion magazine I (5)________, I lived in Kuwait for six months. I also traveled to Qatar, Saudi Arabia and, most often, to Dubai. Over the years I have (6)________ many strange (to me) and interesting things in the Middle East. I’ve seen a woman in burqa eating without removing her veil, deftly slipping her silverware back and forth behind the black (7)________ of the burqa. I’ve had dinner with a sheik in Dubai who wears YSL3 suits but (8)________ sit at a table where alcohol is being served.
In moments like these I am aware of myself as an outsider, a Westerner, an American. I don’t always fully understand the motivations behind what I see in Dubai, but neither (9)________ rushed to make a judgment, just because I don’t understand everything. I see it as my problem, not theirs, if (10)________ it is a problem at all.
Of course, there are some fundamental differences between me and “them”, but there are probably more fundamental similarities. (11)________ their cultural or religious ideas might be, the people I’ve met are primarily interested in (12)________ a living, falling in love and having a good time, pretty much like what my friends in the United States are focused on. It’s true that many people in the Middle East achieve those goals in a different way than I might, but I’m not sure how much I have in common with my fellow Americans in the Bible Belt4, either.
These days I’m more surprised by all the new developments that are going up than anything as ordinary as a burqa. Doha and Dubai (13)________ giant construction sites, as real estate developers race to (14)________ quickly increasing demand. Everywhere you look familiar brands are there - Nike (15)________, Benetton shirts, an explosion of denim on people of all ages. It’s fair to say that, after Allah, globalization is God.
Strangely, after all these years I still haven't spied a camel or seen a belly-dancing show. Maybe on my next trip.

(www.newsweek.com)


0.

A. happen

B. occur

C. turn up

D. seem

1.

A. enlightened

B. eased

C. improved

D. humiliated

2.

A. unacceptable

B. uneasy

C. troublesome

D. provoking

3.

A. gone off

B. grown up

C. brushed up

D. put off

4.

A. getting up

B. bringing up

C. setting up

D. taking up

5.

A. would be edited

B. was about editing

C. was to have been edited

D. was to edit

6.

A. promoted

B. raised

C. encountered

D. acquainted

7.

A. structure

B. clothing

C. dress

D. fabric

8.

A. is reluctant

B. won't

C. is unwilling

D. was keen

9.

A. shall I feel

B. I do feel

C. do I feel

D. I am likely to feel

10.

A. indeed

B. one sees

C. to say that

D. considered as

11.

A. Whatever

B. However

C. Whichever

D. Whatsoever

12.

A. earning

B. owning

C. achieving

D. reaching

13.

A. remind

B. mirror

C. remember

D. resemble

14.

A. complete

B. achieve

C. reach

D. meet

15.

A. hikers

B. joggers

C. sneakers

D. sprinters


2. Reading 1

Read the text below and then read the gapped summary that follows. Your task is to fill the gaps

(1-8) according to what the text says with one word per line. Short forms like “isn't” or “don't” count as two words. Write your answers on the lines on Answer Sheet 1.
Full text:
Airline Security
It was Christmas Day, three months after the trauma of September 11, and a planeload of exhausted, slightly nervous passengers were going home at the last minute for the holidays, on American Airlines flight 363 from Baltimore to Dallas. At the check-in desk, an Arab-American was asked a series of questions and, in the end, he was not allowed to board the plane and was left at the gate. This has happened many times on domestic flights in the United States since September 11, but this time it was different. The Arab-American, Walied Shater, was, in fact, a secret serviceman on his way to guard President George Bush at the "Western White House" in Crawford, Texas. This meant big trouble.
In a discussion about this incident on American TV, an expert used the two words "racial profiling" - one of the most controversial issues in contemporary America. The President said he would be furious if it turned out that Shater was a victim of this practice, in which citizens are selected for special attention because of their skin colour, name or religion. American Airlines said Shater had not been refused permission to board the flight because of his Arab-American identity. Instead, the troubled airline (which lost two planes on September 11) published critical accounts of his behaviour, describing him as angry and aggressive. He had filled in a form which gives permission for government security officers to carry guns on planes, but had filled it in incorrectly twice. His identity was eventually confirmed by the Secret Service, but he had become so aggressive by then that airline officials thought it was best to leave him behind.
Shater has hired lawyers to demand an apology and to force a change in the airline's security measures. The lawyers have gone on television to deny the claims that the presidential bodyguard had behaved unprofessionally. They say it was the pilot who was confrontational. They say that there had been no problem with the gun-carrying forms until the pilot became aware of the passenger's Arab-American identity and a flight attendant found a book on Arab history among his possessions.
It is a fact that Arab-Americans and people with Muslim names have been subjected to much more attention than other passengers on flights since September 11. There have been many cases of people being left off planes because the flight crew and the passengers were worried about their Middle Eastern appearance. One of the key items on the "new security" checklist is checking the passenger list for Islamic names. American Airlines' claim that Shater's Arab-American identity had nothing to do with the pilot's decision looks very dubious. It is hard to imagine the same situation happening to a blond secret serviceman possessing a book about the American Civil War, but the airline insists it would have acted in an identical manner.
It is possible to argue that there might be a significant security benefit in paying particular attention to passengers who fit a certain profile. On the other hand, the role of a Briton, Richard Reid, a Muslim with a non-Muslim name, in the shoe-bomb attempt on an American Airlines flight before Christmas was a clear reminder that the assailants in the next attack may not conform to the stereotype.
If there is clearly a significant benefit to using ethnic profiling in security screening, there could be further discussion of how to balance security and the civil rights of those people who are screened. These are important issues but they are currently being avoided because the phrase "racial profiling", usually associated with redneck cops stopping black motorists for questioning, is politically sensitive.

(www.guardian.co.uk)


Gapped Summary:
The article is about the case of Walied Shater, an Arab-American personal bodyguard of the US President who was denied (1)__________ to board a flight from Baltimore to Dallas on Christmas Day 2001. The incident was followed by a news media uproar in which two parties seemed to emerge, both revolving around the same controversial issue.

Shater claims it was a case of (2)________ _________; American Airlines maintains that Shater's (3)__________ paperwork and subsequent (4)__________, which might have endangered a whole plane, lead to the (5)__________.

The ensuing row has revealed the extreme sensitivity of the airline industry in regard to (6)__________ since the events of September 11. It has also divided those people who believe racial profiling is a legitimate security tool that might have (7)__________ from the point of view of security and those who think (8)________ _________ have been violated because of the various screening measures introduced.

The article concludes by saying that a solution that would appeal to both parties will be hard to find as political factors throw in difficulties in dealing with the issue.



3. Reading 2

Read the text below. After the text you will find six questions or unfinished statements about the text, each with three suggested answers or ways of finishing. You must choose the one which you think fits best according to the text. Mark your answers with an X in the table on Answer Sheet 1.



The Town Without News
What happens when a place loses its newspaper? Most of the 80 or so local papers that have shut down in Britain since the beginning of last year were the second - or third-strongest publications in their markets. But the weekly Bedworth Echo, which published its last issue on 10th July, was the only paper dedicated to the town's news.
A small former mining settlement in the Midlands, Bedworth also lacks a radio station. Although it will still be covered by newspapers focused on its bigger neighbours, it is now a town without news. It will not be the last. With a few exceptions local newspapers are declining quickly. The main reason more local papers have not collapsed, says Paul Zwillenberg, a media consultant, is that they have good operating profits.
An advertising slump has hit local newspapers much harder than national papers or other media. The growing reach of national brands like Auto Trader means that local papers have lost their grip on property and car advertising. Most painful has been the disappearance of job ads. Public-sector recruitment has shifted mostly to official websites in the past few years, and recession has eroded the rest. As it declined, the Echo withdrew from its office in the middle of town and trimmed its coverage of local affairs. By the end it was hardly an effective watchdog. “We used to nearly write the stories for the journalists,” says Richard Chattaway, a county councillor. Not surprisingly, the newspaper's circulation more than halved between 2001 and 2008.
Something is nonetheless being lost with its departure. The Echo carried reports of school plays, notices of future meetings of the Korean War veterans' association, and local sports results. It also reinforced a sense of community. “This is a poor town, and not computer literate,” says Anne Tippett of the Civic Hall, an arts centre. Bedworth has no prominent blog. Indeed, local politicians appear to be just coming around to e-mail as a means of mass communication. Even if online sources of local news existed, they would not reach many of those who relied on the local paper. The Echo was read by skilled manual workers and by the middle-aged and elderly. Claire Enders of Enders Analysis Office notes that the people who most need information about local goings-on are the immobile old and the poor, for whom the news that a local clinic is about to close can be vital. They are the people least likely to have access to broadband.
Yet alternatives are emerging. As its newspaper declined, Bedworth's politicians worked to set up local residents' groups to deliver views and information. Their meetings are advertised by means of leaflets posted through people's doors. The local borough council delivers an increasingly professional-looking newsletter. So do local churches. Oddly, a problem that is high-tech in origin has strengthened a low-tech form of communication. To an extent, the problem of local news is generational - a result of the difficulty of adapting to new technology. As more newspapers fail, it is likely that online local-news outfits will strengthen.

An intriguing experiment is already under way. In northeast England, Trinity Mirror has set up “Gazette Live”, a mix of professional news and user-generated content. The latter is written with the help of local chatterboxes. At the moment local sites tend to be filled with discussions of town fetes and the next music night at the village club. As local papers fail, we may learn their real value was less a check on politicians than simply a forum for casual conversation - a place where a town can talk to itself.



(www.businessweek.com)


  1. According to the text, …

    1. Bedworth Echo was the sole newspaper reporting on Bedworth news.

    2. Paul Zwillenberg says some local newspapers have survived because they have negligible earnings.

    3. Both a) and b) are false.




  1. The accessibility of ‘Auto Trader’ …

    1. has contributed to the disappearance of the Echo.

    2. has proved that advertising in national newspapers has been much less successful.

    3. meant that local newspapers had more advertisers.




  1. As a result of falling revenues, the ‘Bedworth Echo’ …

    1. reduced its news service of local affairs.

    2. started to write the stories for the journalists.

    3. decreased the number of copies that are sold each day.



  1. According to the article, …

    1. all the locals think that the Internet can substitute the local newspaper perfectly.

    2. e-mails from politicians get to as many people as the newspaper did.

    3. the closure of Bedworth Echo has damaged the local sense of belonging.




  1. Which is TRUE according to the article?

    1. In “Gazette Live” political issues are prohibited.

    2. Claire Elders says that the local clinic is about to close.

    3. The function of local newspapers was to offer room for small talk.




  1. What conclusion does the article have?

    1. Local newspapers talk to themselves, they do not communicate with others.

    2. The value of local newspapers was that they gave people room to exchange ideas.

    3. The new local websites will contain news but will not contain discussion forums.

4. Writing
Choose ONE of the topics below and write an argumentative essay of 380-430 words. You will have to include all the content points and your opinion in your essay. You may include arguments (for or against) other than the given ones.

You may use a dictionary.

Write the final version of your essay on Answer Sheet 2.

I. „Quality papers should be much more popular than tabloids: the latter are such a huge sell-out in the world today that one could think people are not interested in other important matters.”


  1. people are tired of information overload; they cannot be expected to read high quality material;

  2. the marketing strategy of quality papers is not as good as that of tabloids;

  3. a proper, undistorted view of the world can only be developed by reading quality papers;

  4. the quality of what people read considerably determines their intelligence;

  5. your opinion.


II. „In Hungary, dual-language education programs – studying several subjects in a foreign language – provide an excellent opportunity for students to develop their foreign language skills on a very high level.”


  1. dual-language school students’ command of a foreign language will give them an advantage over other students when they apply for jobs;

  2. they can benefit from being immersed in two cultures at the same time;

  3. one/students can fully understand the subject matter only in our mother tongue;

  4. teaching Hungarian History and Geography in a foreign language may do more harm than good;

  5. your opinion.



III. „For young mothers it is advisable to stay at home with their children until they are at least three years old.”


  1. opting out of the rat race is a relief for several mothers;

  2. devoting all their attention and care towards their children will surely pay off;

  3. despite the family-friendly rhetoric of companies, mothers can easily lose their jobs while on maternity leave;

  4. concentrating only on children’s upbringing may push mothers into depression and social isolation;

  5. your opinion.



CODE NUMBER

ANSWER SHEET 1
1. Use of English (The Education of an American Tourist )




A

B

C

D







A

B

C

D

0




X










8













1
















9













2
















10













3
















11













4
















12













5
















13













6
















14













7
















15














2. Reading 1 (Airline Security)

  1. ______________

  2. ______________ ______________

  3. ______________

  4. ______________

  5. ______________

  6. ______________

  7. ______________

  8. ______________ ______________


3. Reading 2 (The Town without News)





A

B

C

1










2










3










4










5










6











For the assessors!


Task 1: Maximum Score: 15 – 3 = 12


Achieved Score:





- 3 =




Required Minimum:

none


Task 2: Maximum Score: 8 x 2 = 16


Achieved Score:





x 2 =




Required Minimum:
12 points



Task 3: Maximum Score: 6 x 2 = 12


Achieved Score:





x 2 =




Total:






1. First Assessor (Code Number and Signature) _____________________________
2. Second Assessor (Code Number and Signature) ___________________________

CODE NUMBER
ANSWER SHEET 2

Writing

For the assessors!


Maximum score: 40


Achieved score:





Required minimum: 16 points



1. First Assessor (Code Number and Signature) _____________________________
2. Second Assessor (Code Number and Signature) ___________________________


KEY
1. Use of English (The Education of an American Tourist)




A

B

C

D







A

B

C

D

0




X










8




X







1

X













9







X




2




X










10

X










3










X




11

X










4







X







12

X










5










X




13










X

6







X







14










X

7










X




15







X





2. Reading 1 (Airline Security)

  1. permission

  2. racial profiling//racial discrimination

  3. incorrect//inaccurate//faulty//false//wrong//bad

  4. behaviour //aggression//aggressivity//aggressiveness//actions

  5. refusal//decision//measure//action

  6. security //Muslims//Arab-Americans//Islam//terrorism//terrorists

  7. benefits

  8. civil liberties //civil rights//human rights


3. Reading 2 (The Town without News)






A

B

C

1

X







2

X







3

X







4







X

5







X

6




X







1 disturbing, confusing

2 a burqa is an enveloping outer garment worn by women in some Islamic countries for the purpose of hiding a woman's body and face when in public

3 YSL is a luxury fashion house

4 Bible Belt is a term for an area of the United States in which socially conservative evangelical Protestantism is a significant part of the culture.





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