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Above all else, guard your heart, for it is the wellspring of life


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Heart Harmony | An Essential Oil Blend from VerVita

Above all else, guard your heart, for it is the wellspring of life.” King Solomon, Proverbs


Heart History & Folklore

In the biblical book of Proverbs, it is evident that the Hebrews believed the heart to be the seat of one’s being and origin of one’s thinking, speaking, feeling, choosing, and doing. Early religious literature echoed this understanding that “out of the heart of man” came all manner of evil thoughts and deeds as well as good. Therefore, it was absolutely vital for the human heart to be quickened, guarded, and nourished by wonderful words of wisdom for its continuing wholeness, preservation, longevity, and well-being.


The Greeks and other cultures believed that one’s spirit resided in the heart. It was commonly thought that the heart was an “inner book,” which contained one’s life record, as it were—the sum of one’s lifetime of ideas, beliefs, emotions, memories, desires, longings, secrets, et cetera. The human heart was perceived as much more than a physical pump; it was understood and appreciated as a metaphysical persona.
Heart Disease of Body & Soul

“Heart disease” may be the leading cause of several hundred thousand deaths each year as the result of innumerable cardiovascular disorders, not the least of which is the “broken heart” syndrome with its labyrinthine layers of heartache in terms of guilt, grief, stress, fear, anxiety, disappointment, and unrequited love—the list is legion.


Unlike conventional cardiology with its focus on physical therapy alone, today’s complementary healthcare clinicians—ministers, counselors, chiropractors, naturopaths, and other “alternative” therapists—must listen to their patients and speak to their metaphysical hearts—the “mental heart” afflicted by hostility, depression, and stress; the “emotional heart” crushed by agonizing loss; the “intelligent heart” disengaged from its cognitive communication with the brain and other parts of the body; and the “spiritual heart” disconnected from its creator and fellow creatures.
Heart Healing with Essential Oils

Skilled in the therapeutic application of essential oils, the health professional seeks to help the hurting heart that yearns for a higher purpose and satisfaction in life. A clinician seeks to provide positive wellness care wherein the goal is to change the focus from what causes a heavy heart to what causes a happy heart. Essential oils may be the synergist, combining with and increasing the effects of those things that cause a happy heart.


Heart Harmony™ from VerVita™ is a synergistic blend of some 15 essential oils formulated to do foster healing for both the physical and metaphysical heart with the goal to reduce pessimism and induce optimism for a happier heart and a healthier life—in short, to achieve heart harmony. Extracted from a southwestern desert shrub and renowned for its moisturizing and emulsifying properties (similar to the skin’s natural emollients), Jojoba oil (Simmondsia chinensis) serves as the “carrier” oil, a liquid wax resembling skin sebum used alone as a pore cleanser, hair conditioner, and sunscreen.
The Single Essential Oils of Heart Harmony

In addition to the heart-specific, cardiotonic properties of Lavender, Peppermint, Rose, Rosemary, Neroli, and Ylang Ylang Extra which strengthen the heart musculature and normalize heart arrhythmias, the synergy of the essential oil constituents of Heart Harmony™ provide innumerable healthcare benefits including the following:




  • Skin: Acne, oily skin, spots, congested pores, scars, stretch marks, wrinkles

  • Systems: Circulatory (fluid retention), gastrointestinal (dyspepsia), neurological (insomnia), reproductive (sterility)

  • Actions: Antimicrobial, antiseptic, antispasmodic, sedative, stimulant, tonic, antidepressant , carminative, respiratory, analgesic, anti-coagulant, anti- convulsive, anti-toxic, regenerative, anti-catarrhal




Mandarin (Citrus reticulata)

Native to the Far East, southern China, and Italy, this fruity citrus oil is named for its use as a traditional gift to the Chinese mandarins. It is well-known as a rescue remedy for calming the spirit and balancing the emotions.



Constituents: Limonene, methyl methylanthranilate, geraniol, citral, citronellal. [Julia Lawless, The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Essential Oils (Rockport, MA: Element Books, 1995), 121.]

Possible Uses as a single oil: Acne, dull skin, insomnia, oily skin, scars, spots, stress, wrinkles. [Julia Lawless, The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Essential Oils (Rockport, MA: Element Books, 1995), 56

Safety Information: Essential Oil Safety by Robert Tisserand does not indicate any special precautions when using this oil. [Robert Tisserand, Essential Oil Safety (United Kingdom: Churchill Livingstone, 1995), 219.]





Lavender (Lavandula angustifolia)

Originally grown around the Mediterranean, this sweet-scented aromatic flower provides aromatherapy with its most popular oil. Its versatile attributes characterize it as a veritable universal oil for calming, relaxing, refreshing, cleansing, toning, and most importantly, for the restoration of imbalanced states of both body and soul. Deriving its name from the Latin in light of its use in cleansing wounds, Lavender in the Middle Ages was also employed for sexual modulation and an aphrodisiac, as required. The pilgrims of the New World recognized Lavender’s medicinal value by noting its benefits as especially good for “all griefes and paines of the head and brain.” Invaluable as a first aid antiseptic remedy, it comes in handy for burns, wounds, sores, insect stings, scabies, head lice, and headaches.



Constituents: Linalyl Acetate, Linalol, Terpinenol, Cineole, Beta-Caryophyllene, Farnascene [Shirley Price, The Aromatherapy Workbook (Hammersmith, London: Thorsons, 1993), 54-5.]

Possible Uses as a single oil: Acne, allergies, anxiety, asthma, athlete's foot, bruises, burns, chicken pox, colic, cuts, cystitis, depression, dermatitis, dysmenorrhea, earache, flatulence, headache, hypertension, insect bites, insect repellant, itching, labor pains, migrane, oily skin, rheumatism, scabies, scars, sores, sprains, strains, stress, stretch marks, vertigo, whooping cough. [Julia Lawless, The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Essential Oils (Rockport, MA: Element Books, 1995), 56-67.]

Safety Information: Essential Oil Safety by Robert Tisserand does not indicate any special precautions when using this oil. [Robert Tisserand, Essential Oil Safety (United Kingdom: Churchill Livingstone, 1995), 207.]

Geranium Bourbon (Pelargonium graveolens)

Thought to be under the influence of Venus in ancient cultures, the rich, rose-like scent of Geranium was known for its “staying power” and as a refreshing and relaxing tonic. Historically, Geranium was used for everything under the sun including dysentery, hemorrhoids, inflammations, heavy menstruation, bone fractures, tumors, wounds, diabetes, diarrhea, gallbladder, gastric ulcer, jaundice, sterility, and urinary stones.

Properties, Actions & Effects As A Single Oil

Antibacterial - destroying or stopping growth of bacteria
Antifungal - destroys or inhibits growth of fungus
Analgesic - pain reliever
Antidepressant - alleviates or prevents depression, lifts mood, counters melancholia
Antiseptic - prevents, halts infection
Astringent - causes contraction of organic tissues
Deodorant - an agent that corrects, masks, or removes unpleasant odors
Hormone - a product of living cells that produces a specific effect on the activity of cells remote from its point of origin
Insecticide - Repels insects
Regulator - an agent that helps balance and regulate the functions of the body
Relaxant - soothing, causing relaxation, relieving strain or tension
Sedative - agent that exerts a soothing, tranquilizing, calming effect on the body, good for nervous tension, stress, insomnia, anxiety and palpitations
Tonic - strengthens and enlivens the whole or specific parts of the body

CAUTION: Geranium oil can lower blood sugar and should be avoided in cases of hypoglycemia. Due to its hormonal effect avoid Geranium during pregnancy

Clove Bud (Syzgium aromaticum)

Clove offers a comforting, sweet, spicy, orange aroma whose scent evokes a sense of calm energy and mood elevation suitable for taking action. Providing the highest source of Eugenol, it is known to suppress detrimental bacteria, fungi and viruses (including Herpes Simplex Type I and II), scavenge superoxide free radicals, alleviate pain, and even stimulate hair growth as well as restore hair color.

Constituents: Eugenol, eugenyl acetate, caryophyllene, isocaryophyllene. [B. Lawrence, "Major Tropical Spices - Clove," Essential Oils, 1977, 84-145, cited in Salvatore Battaglia, The Complete Guide to Aromatherapy (Australia: The Perfect Potion, 1997), 157.]

Possible Uses: Arthritis, asthma, bronchitis, rheumatism, sprains, strains, toothache. [Julia Lawless, The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Essential Oils (Rockport, MA: Element Books, 1995), 59-62.]

Safety Information: Mucous membrane and dermal irritant. Avoid in alcoholism, in haemophilia, in prostatic cancer, with kidney and liver problems and if taking anticoagulants. [Robert Tisserand, Essential Oil Safety (United Kingdom: Churchill Livingstone, 1995), 131.]

Rosemary (Rosmarius officinalis)

Rosemary, meaning “Dew of the Sea,” is a fresh, herbaceous scent with both purifying and antimicrobial properties. During the Middle Ages, dried Rosemary was burned in for protection against the Black Plague and other infectious diseases. Held sacred by many civilizations, it was thought to be a potent fumigant for warding off evil spirits, as well as for stimulating a “zest for life” in those who were not thriving. Clinically, Rosemary’s efficacy has been recognized in chronic disorders such as multiple sclerosis.

Constituents: Cineole, Pinene, Borneol, Linalol, Alpha-Terpineol, Terpinen-4-ol, Bornyl Acetate, Camphor, Thujone, Camphene, Limonene, Beta-Caryophyllene [Shirley Price, The Aromatherapy Workbook (Hammersmith, London: Thorsons, 1993), 54-5.]

Possible Uses: Aching muscles, arthritis, dandruff, dull skin, exhaustion, gout, hair care, muscle cramping, neuralgia, poor circulation, rheumatism. [Julia Lawless, The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Essential Oils (Rockport, MA: Element Books, 1995), 56-67.]

Safety Information: Neurotoxic (toxic to the nerves). Avoid in pregnancy. Avoid in epilepsy, fever (no essential oil should be taken internally without the guidance of a qualified aromatherapy practitioner). [Robert Tisserand, Essential Oil Safety (United Kingdom: Churchill Livingstone, 1995), 165.]

Peppermint (Mentha piperita)

Its potent, refreshing, cooling, and minty aroma account for its popular use in gum, candy, toothpaste, and skin care oils. Applied topically to the forehead it may alleviate headaches; to the chest it may ameliorate respiration; and elsewhere it may reduce neuralgia pain as well as destroy herpes simplex viruses. Anecdotally, peppermint is also believed to enhance subjective energy levels.

Constituents: Menthyl Acetate, Menthone, Cineole, Limonene, Phellandrene, Pinene, Beta-Caryophyllene [Shirley Price, The Aromatherapy Workbook (Hammersmith, London: Thorsons, 1993), 54-5.]

Possible Uses: Asthma, colic, exhaustion, fever, flatulence, headache, nausea, scabies, sinusitis, vertigo. [Julia Lawless, The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Essential Oils (Rockport, MA: Element Books, 1995), 59-67.]

Safety Information: Avoid in cardiac fibrillation, epilepsy, fever. Mucous membrane irritant and neurotoxic (toxic to the nerves). Some of this information applies to oral use, but is provided for informational purposes (no essential oil should be taken internally without the guidance of a qualified aromatherapy practitioner). [Robert Tisserand, Essential Oil Safety .

Myrtle (Myrtus communis)

This cultivated Mediterranean garden plant exudes a sweet, penetrating scent typically employed in addressing oily skin and enlarged pores. Dating from the doctoring of Dioscorides, its most important properties are antiseptic and antibacterial in treating pulmonary and urinary tract infections, making it an effective remedy as a chest massage during the cold and flu season.

Constituents: Cineol, myrtenol, pinene, geraniol, linalool, camphene. [Julia Lawless, The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Essential Oils (Rockport, MA: Element Books, 1995), 182.]

Possible Uses: Asthma, coughs, sore throat. [Julia Lawless, The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Essential Oils (Rockport, MA: Element Books, 1995), 62-63.]

Safety Information: Essential Oil Safety by Robert Tisserand does not indicate any special precautions when using this oil. [Robert Tisserand, Essential Oil Safety (United Kingdom: Churchill Livingstone, 1995), 208.]

Lemongrass (Cymbopogon flexuosus)

Used as a cleansing and astringent agent in skin care preparations, this tropical grass is a traditional Indian medicine for infectious diseases and fevers, athlete’s foot, excessive perspiration, nervous exhaustion, stress-related issues, and as an insect repellant Constituents: Citral, Geranyl Acetate, Linalyl Acetate, Geranial, Neral, Limonene, Myrcene, Beta-caryophyllene [Shirley Price, The Aromatherapy Workbook (Hammersmith, London: Thorsons, 1993), 54-5.]

Possible Uses: Acne, athlete's foot, excessive perspiration, flatulence, insect repellent, muscle aches, oily skin, scabies, stress. [Julia Lawless, The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Essential Oils (Rockport, MA: Element Books, 1995), 56-67.]

Safety Information: Avoid in glaucoma and with children. Use caution in prostatic hyperplasia and with skin hypersensitivity or damaged skin. [Robert Tisserand, Essential Oil Safety (United Kingdom: Churchill Livingstone, 1995), 146.]

Rose Otto (Rosa damascena)

Distilled from the ancient damask rose, Rose Otto exerts a powerful effect on the emotions and spirit by bringing peace and harmony as well as dispelling fear and tension. This “Queen of Flowers” evinces a complex chemistry suitable for disorders of the female reproductive system including regulation of the menstrual cycle and sexual disturbances of an emotional nature.



Constituents of Rose Otto: Citronellol, Geraniol, Nerol, Farnesol, Esters, Rose Oxide, Limonene, Myrcene, Pinene [Shirley Price, The Aromatherapy Workbook (Hammersmith, London: Thorsons, 1993), 54-5.]

Possible Uses: Depression, eczema, frigidity, mature skin, menopause, stress. [Julia Lawless, The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Essential Oils (Rockport, MA: Element Books, 1995), 57-67.]

Safety Information: Essential Oil Safety by Robert Tisserand does not indicate any special precautions when using this oil. [Robert Tisserand, Essential Oil Safety (United Kingdom: Churchill Livingstone, 1995), 210.]

Neroli (Citrus aurantium) Orange Blossoms

Distilled from the fragrant, pale yellow flower of the Seville orange tree and named for an Italian princess, Neroli has a deep, intoxicating floral aroma which works well for soothing the agitated nervous states of those in despair and grief. Commonly found in perfumes, a small drop on the tongue may even act as an effective breath freshener.



Constituents: Linalyl Acetate, Limonene, Linalol, Nerolidol, Geraniol, Alpha-Terpineol, Geranyul Acetate, Neryl Acetate [Shirley Price, The Aromatherapy Workbook (Hammersmith, London: Thorsons, 1993), 54-5.]

Possible Uses: Depression, frigidity, insomnia, mature skin, scars, shock, stress, stretch marks. [Julia Lawless, The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Essential Oils (Rockport, MA: Element Books, 1995), 59-67.]

Safety Information: Essential Oil Safety by Robert Tisserand does not indicate any special precautions when using this oil. [Robert Tisserand, Essential Oil Safety (United Kingdom: Churchill Livingstone, 1995), 208.]

Ylang Ylang Extra (Cananga odorata)

This “Flower of Flowers” of a small tropical tree in the Philippines, Java, Sumatra, and Madagascar offers an intense and sensual floral aroma prized for perfumes whose scent encourages the spirit and consoles the heart. Combined with rosewood, sandalwood and cocoa butter it becomes an exotic body emollient, and mixed with coconut oil an aromatic hair dressing. Clinically it worked to slow down rapid breathing and heartbeat, bring down high blood pressure, and remedy frigidity and impotence.

Constituents: Linalol, Farnesol, Geraniol, Geranial, Benzyl Acetate, Geranyl Acetate, Eugenol, Methyl Chavicol, Pinene*Beta-Caryophyllene, Farnasene [Shirley Price, The Aromatherapy Workbook (Hammersmith, London: Thorsons, 1993), 54-5.]

Possible Uses: Anxiety, depression, frigidity, hypertension, palpitations, stress. [Julia Lawless, The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Essential Oils (Rockport, MA: Element Books, 1995), 61-67.]

Safety Information: Possible sensitization. [Robert Tisserand, Essential Oil Safety (United Kingdom: Churchill Livingstone, 1995), 211.]

Jasmine (Jasminum grandiflorum)

Known as the “King of Flowers” for its potent floral aroma, Jasmine’s extract exudes a certain masculine nature, despite its feminine appearance and application as a uterine tonic for menstrual pain and cramping. Commonly found in sensual perfumes and massage oils, Jasmine is known to alleviate depression and diminish fear.

Constituents: Benzyl zcetate, linalool, benzyl alcohol, indole, benzyl benzoate, cis-jasmone, geraniol, methyl anthranilate, p.cresol, farnesol, cis-3-hexenyl benzoate, eugenol, nerol, ceosol, benzoic acide, benzaldehyde, y-terpineol, nerolidol, isophytol, phytol. [B. Lawrence, "Jasmine Oil," Perfumer & Flavorist, November 1977, 36, cited in Salvatore Battaglia, The Complete Guide to Aromatherapy (Australia: The Perfect Potion, 1997), 170.]

Possible Uses: Depression, dry skin, exhaustion, labor pains, sensitive skin. [Julia Lawless, The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Essential Oils (Rockport, MA: Element Books, 1995), 57-67.]

Safety Information: Essential Oil Safety by Robert Tisserand does not indicate any special precautions when using this oil. [Robert Tisserand, Essential Oil Safety (United Kingdom: Churchill Livingstone, 1995), 207.]

Frankincense (Boswellia sacra)

Meaning “real incense” from Medieval French, Frankincense is best known as one of the three priceless gifts of the Wise Men in the Christmas story. Its sweet balsamic aroma made it suitable for temple and altar liturgies as a sacred fumigant and ritual incense in the Middle East. Its action on the nervous system reduced anxiety and nervous tension by slowing down and deepening respiration, thereby making it suitable for spiritual use in prayer and meditation. Its ground ash created the distinctive Egyptian eye makeup.

Constituents: Limonene, Pinene, Borneol, Farnesol, Phellandrene, Myrcene [Shirley Price, The Aromatherapy Workbook (Hammersmith, London: Thorsons, 1993), 54-5.]

Possible Uses: Anxiety, asthma, bronchitis, extreme coughing, scars, stress, stretch marks. [Julia Lawless, The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Essential Oils (Rockport, MA: Element Books, 1995), 59-67.]

Safety Information: Essential Oil Safety by Robert Tisserand does not indicate any special precautions when using this oil. [Robert Tisserand, Essential Oil Safety (United Kingdom: Churchill Livingstone, 1995), 206.]

Cinnamon Bark (Cinnamomum cassia)

In the 5th c. BC the Jewish Torah makes reference to this ancient herbal medicine. More than a comforting aroma, it acts on the immune system by stimulating circulation in the extremities thereby making the fingers and toes a whole lot happier.

Constituents: Eugenol, eugenol acetate, cinnamic aldehyde, benzyl benzoate. [B. Lawrence, "Cinnamon Leaf and Bark Oil," Perfumer & Flavorist, August/September 1978, 54, cited in Salvatore Battaglia, The Complete Guide to Aromatherapy (Australia: The Perfect Potion, 1997), 154.]

Possible Uses: Constipation, exhaustion, flatulence, lice, low blood pressure, rheumatism, scabies, stress. [Julia Lawless, The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Essential Oils (Rockport, MA: Element Books, 1995), 58-67.]

Safety Information: Mucous membrane irritant and strong skin sensitizer. Avoid in alcoholism, in haemophilia, in prostatic cancer, with kidney and liver problems and if taking anticoagulants. Only the oil from the leaf should be used. The oil from the bark is too hazardous. [Robert Tisserand, Essential Oil Safety (United Kingdom: Churchill Livingstone, 1995), 130.]

Roman Chamomile (Chamaemelum nobile)

Culturally popular as an herbal tea with its sweet, apple-like aroma, it soothes the skin, alleviates soreness, and combines with lavender for bathing and with distilled water for misting. As one of the most gentle essential oils, it is found in children’s remedies and recommended for common female menstrual and menopausal issues.

Constituents: High Ester Content, Pinocarvone, Pinene, Bisabolol, Farnesol, Pinocarveol, Cineole, Azulene, Beta-caryophyllene, Camphene, Myrcene [Shirley Price, The Aromatherapy Workbook (Hammersmith, London: Thorsons, 1993), 54-5.]

Possible Uses: Abscesses, allergies, arthritis, boils, colic, cuts, cystitis, dermatitis, dysmenorrhea, earache, flatulence, hair, headache, inflamed skin, insect bites, insomnia, nausea, neuralgia, PMS, rheumatism, sores, sprains, strains, stress, wounds. [Julia Lawless, The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Essential Oils (Rockport, MA: Element Books, 1995), 56-67.]

Safety Information: May cause dermatitis in some. [Julia Lawless, The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Essential Oils (Rockport, MA: Element Books, 1995), 109.]

Contact Reflex Analysis® / Heart HarmonyTM Application

Corresponding to a CRA® Pulse of 70, Heart Harmony™ serves to support the synergism and rhythm of the heart-brain relationship. Existing research indicates that the heart and brain interact electrically, biochemically, and mechanically. The brain and heart send signals to one another through the nervous system. Studies have shown that the heart sends more signals to the brain than the brain to the heart. This communication is a dynamic “dialogue” with each influencing the function of the other.


Throughout life, a person encounters many experiences. Through these experiences the brain stores emotions and forms a variety of perceptions, which causes people to react or respond to their world in unique ways. As the brain reacts, neural messages travel down the medulla to the heart. These messages can affect the heart’s rhythm. The heart then communicates back to the brain. Research has shown that the brain both identifies and obeys the messages from the heart. The heart has the capability of sending positive life-giving messages to the brain. If these messages are sustained, the brain can be brought into entrainment with the heart.
If, however, a person experiences pain and the heart is not able to release it, but instead stores the pain, stores the emotions, stores the memory, it will become weak and ineffective. When the heart is held captive by pain, the brain decides to take over as guide, governor, and counselor. Unfortunately the brain has also reacte to and stored these same experiences. The brain will try to use logic to override the emotions. Emotions, however, are created, sent out, and stored at a faster rate than logical thinking. Logical thing cannot counter emotions without the help of the heart for any extended period of time. Instead of fixing the problem the brain, also in captivity, tends to make things worse. It will send its own messages of the pain, loss, and depression down to the heart. The heart becomes overwhelmed and continues to be a prisoner to the pain.

  • To bless a hurting or broken heart, daily rub Heart Harmony liberally downward over the chest, upward on the back of the neck, and over the knees in the morning and evening at bedtime.

  • Those with broken hearts are encourage to take a hot, relaxing “spa” bath with 1 ounce of Heart Harmony and three cupfuls of Epson salts—Lavender preferably—for 30 minutes every 6-12 weeks.

  • Soaking the feet in a hot foot bath, water above the ankles, with ½ ounce of Heart Harmony and one cupful of Epson salts for 30 minutes at bedtime will yield similar results.


Note: Best results occur with the “spa” baths when one has a full stomach. Eat before bathing or having a foot bath.
Side Effects: Few experience a rash, slight fever or burning sensation when the immune system begins to work hard to cleanse the body. If this occurs add additional Epson salt or Magnesium Chloride to the water to reduce the fever and cool the burning sensation. If one feels faint, weak, or has a difficult time “catching their breath”, test for anemia. As essential oils are absorbed, they utilize the oxygen in the cells. If one is anemic, there is not enough oxygen moving through the body.
Contraindicated in pregnancy and lactation.
For Prevention and Maintenance daily apply Heart Harmonyliberally downward over the chest, upward on the back of the neck, and over the knees daily in the morning and evening at bedtime. One can also choose to bathe or have a foot bath as described above, every 6-12 weeks.




Essential Oil Safety for Therapeutic Grade Essential Oil Safety

General Safety Information: Do not take any oils internally without consultation from a qualified healthcare practitioner. Do not apply undiluted essential oils, absolutes, CO2s or other concentrated essences onto the skin. If you are pregnant, lactating, epileptic, have liver damage, have cancer, or have any other medical problem, use oils only under the proper guidance of your healthcare practitioner. Use extreme caution when using oils with children and give children only the gentlest oils at extremely low doses. It is safest to consult a qualified healthcare practitioner before using oils with children. A skin patch test on the inner arm is recommended prior to using oil that you've never used before.



Sources

Chevallier, Andrew. The Encyclopedia of Medicinal Plants. New York, NY: DK Publishing, 1996.

Davis, Patricia. Aromatherapy: An A-Z. New York, NY: Barnes & Noble Books, 1995.

Duke, James A. Herbs of the Bible: 2000 Years of Plant Medicine. Loveland, CO: Interweave Press, 1999.

Higley, Connie & Alan. Reference Guide for Essential Oils. Spanish Fork: UT: Abundant Health, 2006.

HyperHealth: Science-Based Natural Encyclopedia of Nutrition & Natural Health CD-ROM, 2006.

Lawless, Julia. The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Essential Oils. Rockport, MA: Element Books, 1995.

Tucker, Arthur, and Thomas Debaggio. The Big Book of Herbs. Loveland, CO: Interweave Press, 2000.


These statements have not been evaluated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.
















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